How Old is Too Old for Surrogate Motherhood?

Posted on: January 27th 2014

At 58 years old, would you feel comfortable accepting the role of being a surrogate? Well, in Provo, Utah, that’s the age at which a woman has become a surrogate mother for her daughter and son-in-law. It’s the latest story in a shift toward women becoming surrogates at older ages, and it’s causing many women to consider how old may be too old for surrogate motherhood.

The decision to become a surrogate at an older age works well in some situations, but not every woman can or would want to become pregnant at 40, or 50, or 60. If you’re thinking of becoming a surrogate, but are concerned about your age, review the following age factors to determine if surrogacy is right for you.


Want to become a surrogate but concerned about your age? Learn the risks and assess your situation to make the best plan of action.

Reviewing the Average Surrogate Age

When considering how old may be too old for surrogate motherhood, it’s important to first review the typical age of surrogate mothers. On average, surrogate mothers are between the ages of 21 and 37 years old.

Often, surrogate mothers are required to be at least 21 years old to ensure they are ready to deal with the intricacies of surrogate parenting. Also, women younger than 21 may not yet have their own children, which is typically a requirement for surrogacy. The upper end of that age range may not be the cut off put in place by agencies but, instead, the personal age limit at which many women are no longer confident in pursuing a healthy surrogate pregnancy and childbirth.

Considering Possible Complications of Surrogacy at an Older Age

When thinking of becoming a surrogate at an older age, you must consider the possible complications of pregnancy and childbirth. Although many older women have successful pregnancies and childbirths, problems can occur and you must be prepared to handle them.

Certain chronic illnesses such as high blood pressure, diabetes and preeclampsia arise more commonly among women who become pregnant at an older age. However, staying fit and active can help offset potential problems. Also, if you decide to become a surrogate, going to every prenatal appointment will be very important to help catch and monitor potential problems in their early stages.

Assessing Your Circumstances

More than anything, your situation and health factors will impact whether you can become a surrogate at an older age. Every woman is different and every situation is different. Before you look into the possibility of becoming a surrogate, schedule an appointment with your OB/GYN.

At the appointment, tell your doctor about your intentions to become a surrogate and voice any concerns you may have regarding the decision. Listen intently to your doctor’s advice and thoroughly review all results of your physical exam. These conclusions should offer a firm plan of action as to whether or not you should become a surrogate.


Thinking of becoming a surrogate? Scheduling an appointment with your doctor is an important first step.

Remember, no two surrogate motherhoods are the same. The age at which some women feel comfortable becoming pregnant will likely not be the same for you. At Family Formation, we’ve helped women in many age groups become surrogates and we’re here to help you as well. Contact us today to learn more about our services.

5 thoughts on “How Old is Too Old for Surrogate Motherhood?”

  1. My name is Andrea Davis I am 55 years old 4 grown children I would like to be a surrogate. You can reach me at 6194808270 please contact me. Thank you

  2. i’m a 51 year old and would like to assist my partner in being her surrogate, is there anything I should be worried about regarding my age?

  3. Seriously considering this even though I’m 45,seems such a waste of pretty high fertility for my age,even though I don’t want anymore children personally AT ALL I still have the urge to be pregnant & give birth I just don’t feel maternal anymore,obvs I do towards the children I do have,the feeling I sense I’d get handing over a baby for a couple who could give it a loving stable life,I’m not even sure I’d want paying as it then becomes about money & it’s not just overly wealthy couples that deserve that privilege,as long as my pregnancy was catered for,I.e larger clothes as I grew,food the parents request I ate should it not be on my usual shopping list,travel costs to appts but I wouldn’t even know where to start 🤷‍♀️ Has anyone reading this done all the above?!?

    1. I feel I’d like to make my mind up way in advance of my 1st GP’s appt to arrange the required pre pregnancy health checks as my surgery has many different Dr’s I see,some who may have personal religious or ethical views,some will have + and – advice,none know me personally,the only advice I’d be looking for was if there became a serious health issue physically or mentally that the Dr would deem me unfit for surrogacy,I’d hate to build up a potential couples hopes only for someone to feel it’s they’re place to attempt to talk me out of it,mind you if a Dr did give me genuine doubts I suppose it would show my mind actually isn’t made up…I didn’t actually think I’d thought about it quite so seriously until I read my comments back before sending,do hope someone picks up on these as I have loads more questions which then branch off into sub questions! 🤣🙈 as long as my existing children/family weren’t to suffer as a result of the decisions I made I’d allow my life to be somewhat changed & altered to suit any potential parents,surely that’s seen as normal really,living the pregnancy how they would if it was they’re own biological pregnancy,the race of sperm donor isn’t a problem should the couple be of mixed race,My blood group is rhesus negative though so a slightly extra thing to be aware of to observe,I’ve never had any related problems in the past,vitamin K jabs for baby & me soon after birth if I remember rightly although I’ve actually forgotten why but I think it’s to do with my blood clashing with baby’s as I swear all children have the fathers blood group,so I suppose it’s like putting unleaded petrol into a leaded engine,although don’t quote me as I was told all this under the effects of gas & air!! 🤣

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